What are some Georgia Specific Workers Compensation Laws

If you injure yourself at work, you will probably find that your employer has an insurance plan in place called Workers’ Compensation. This insurance plan may pay for your lost wages, medical treatment, and permanent injury benefits, but you must qualify under the Georgia Workers’ Compensation Act before you can receive the benefits. So, how do you know if you qualify or if your company even offers it? Take a look at some specific information about Georgia Workers’ Compensation laws.

Worker

How Do You Know if a Company is Covered by Workers’ Compensation? 

If your company employs three or more people, including part-time workers, legally, it should have the coverage. If you aren’t sure, you can visit the State Board of Workers’ Compensation website to verify your employer’s insurance.  Except in unique employment circumstances, you are automatically covered the day you begin working for such a company.

 

What Happens When You Have an Accident? 

If your company employs three or more people, including part-time workers, legally, it should have the coverage. If you aren’t sure, you can visit the State Board of Workers’ Compensation website to verify your employer’s insurance.  Except in unique employment circumstances, you are automatically covered the day you begin working for such a company.

 

What Exactly Does Workers’ Compensation Cover? 

Workers’ compensation covers anything authorized by the carrier to treat your injury or illness. This might include doctor and hospital bills, therapy, medication and even travel expenses as necessary. If your injury occurred after June 30, 2013, you can receive medical benefits for up to 400 weeks, though in extreme cases that prevent you from ever returning to work, you may receive lifetime medical benefits.  If you are out of work for more than seven days, you may receive weekly income benefits, as well.

 

What Happens if the Injury Leads to Death?  

If you die in an on-the-job accident after June 30, 2013, your spouse and minor children are entitled to two-thirds of your average weekly income up to $525.00 per week. If you do not have children, your spouse can only receive up to $150,000.00.

 

What Happens If Your Employer Fails to Pay?  

If you die in an on-the-job accident after June 30, 2013, your spouse and minor children are entitled to two-thirds of your average weekly income up to $525.00 per week. If you do not have children, your spouse can only receive up to $150,000.00.

 

You may also hire a lawyer to help ensure you receive your benefits or to help represent you at your hearing. Ashenden & Associates can help. Call 770-394-8909 to set up a consultation.  

 

 

 

 

 

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